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Am I entitled to paid time off if I have a baby?

| Mar 26, 2021 | Discrimination

Spending time with your baby is crucial to the child’s well-being and yours. While the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) permitted you to take unpaid leave, many workers could not afford to. New legislation to address this came into place last year. The Federal Employees Paid Parental Leave Act (FEPPLA) allows you paid leave to look after your baby.

How much paid parental leave does the FEPPLA provide?

The FEPPLA provides you with 12 weeks of paid parental leave. If the other parent also works for a federal agency, they can also take 12 weeks. You can do this at the same time or at different times.

You can only take this leave during the 12 months after your child is born. There is no provision to take time off before birth.

Does FEPPLA also apply to adoption?

If adopting a child, you are also entitled to this 12 weeks of paid leave. You must take this within 12 months.

How long do I need to have worked for the federal agency to claim FEPPLA?

To qualify for FEPPLA, you need to have worked for your employer for at least a year. You may be eligible if you work part-time, depending on the number of hours you work.

Can I take paid parental leave if I do not intend to return to work?

To claim FEPPLA, you must promise to return to work for at least 12 weeks after your period of leave. If you do not, your federal employer may ask you to repay the money paid during your time off. If there is a good reason why you cannot return to work, they may waive this penalty.

Can I take more time off if I combine FMLA and FEPPLA?

FMLA offers you 12 weeks of unpaid leave in 12 months. There are ways to take advantage of this in combination with FEPPLA. It depends on dates. Seek legal advice if you are unsure of your entitlement to paid or unpaid leave. Calculating entitlement when combining FMLA and FEPPLA can be particularly complex.

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